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TIlE O:TARIO READERS 

FIRST BOOK 

AUTHORIZED BY 
THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

Entered, according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the yea 1]-, 
in the office o! the 3linister o! Agriculture by the 
IINISTII OF EDUCATION FOI OTAP,10 

TORONTO 
+T. EATON 



FIRST READER 

MORNING HYMN 

FATHER, we thank Thee fi,r the light, 
And fi)r the blessings of the night; 
For rest and tbod, and h,ving care, 
And all that makes the worhi so thir. 

Help us to do the things we should. 
To 1,e to others kind and g.d ; 
In all we do, in work {r play, 
To grow more loving every day. 

EVENING PRAYER 

FATIIER, who keepest 
The stars in Thv care, 
Me, t,.,, Thv little one, 
Childish in prayer, 
Keep, as Thou keepest 
The soft night through, 
Thy hmg, white lilies 
Asleel, in Thy dew. 



"2 FI RST READER 

THE SWING 

How do you like t,, go Ul ill a swing, 
['p in the air ,so l,lue? 
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing 
Ever a ehihl can 

Up in the air and over the wall. 
Till I can see so wide, 
Rivers and tree.s and cattle and all 
()vet the eountD-side 

Till I look down on the garden 'een, 
Down m the roof so 1)rown-- 
[-1  in the air I go flying again, 
[-p in the air and down 



WHO IS IT 5 

' He went to catch  dicky-1}ird, 
And thought he could nt fail 
Because he'd got a little salt. 
To lint Ul.m its lail.'" 

"Are you wee Willie Winkle 
who runs through the town?" 
"No, I never rtn tl)-,stairs and 
(lown-stairs in my night-gown." 
" Are you Peter Piper who pick- 
ed a peck of pickled peppers ?" 
" Why co,it you tell who I am ?" 
" I would if I could, if I couldn't, 
how could I ?" 
" Why, Papa" 
"Ah, now I knowfkther's little 
girl." 



THE LITTI.E NUT 

. LITTLE ]ll'l,Wll ]lLIllV. 
r,,und and wee. 
Wiih kind win,l. 
t,, rock him. 
And Ire g'rew 
and he grew, till 
He lbll right m of 

cradle ilie day. 

D, iwii, t|,Jwn froin /he tree-top, a very bad 
filll ] 
But thi llleel ' litlle lllow was n hlil' 
Now Soilnd and sweet lie lies dBvn in the 
grass, 
And there wm will find him whenever yo 

Do ,'is VOll wmhl be dlie by. 
It is never too late to mend. 



BIRI) THOUGHTS 7 

BIRI) THOUGHTS 

I LIVED first in a little l,mse. 
And lived there very well; 
I thought tile worhl was small and round, 
And made tf lmle blue shell. 

I lived next in a little nest, 
Nor needed any ,ther; 
I tlt,ug'ht the world was made ,l" straw. 
And lm,ded by my m,ther. 

One day [ fluttered fl'om tile nest, 
To see what I cmhl find. 
I said, "The world is nmde ,1" leaxes-- 
l have 1,een very ldind.'" 

At length I flew 1,ewmd tile tree, 
Quite fit ti,r gn,wn-up 
I don't know how tile world is made, 
And neither d my neighl,mrs. 

IF a task is once legun, 
Never leave it till it's 



ttOW DID HE DO IT 9 

As he sat there a hare came 
along. 
" Why d, )', cry?" asked tle 
hare. 
"I (.ry because I cannot get the 
goats out of the field," said the 
l)oy. 
"I'll do it," said lhc hare. 
So he tried, but the gats would 
]ot 
Then the hare, o. sat d[w 
cried. 
Along came a fix. " Why 
you .ry?" asked the fox. 
" I am crying" lccause the I)oy 
cries," said the hare. "The 
is crying because he cannot get 
three goats out of the turnip field." 
" FII do it," said the fox. 



HOli DID HE DO IT 11 

hill and sw tltetn rill sitting there 
crying. 
" Why d volt cry'?" said the Iee 
to the wolf'. 
"[ am crying because the 
cries. The tbx is crying Iecause 
the hare cries. The hare cries le- 
m. e the 1,v <.ties. The lv cries 
because he camot ,,/ct the goats 
out o1' lhe turnip field." 
" I'll do it," said the Iee. 
Then the big animals and the 
by stopped cryin/ a noncnt to 
laugh at the tiny Ice. 
But the Iec flew away inlo the 
turnip fiehl and alighted ]on one 
of the goats, and said, 
   tlZ-Z=Z-Z-Z " 
And out ran the goals, every ouel 
EMIL POULSSON 



THREE LITTLE KITTENS 
"No, you slmll have no pie." 
"Mce-ow, lnee-ow, IlI('(-(W.  
The three little kittens fouud their 
mittens, 
And they began to cry, 
"0 mother dear, 
See here, see here! 
See! we have tbund ,ur mittens." 
"Put on your mittens, 
You silly kigtens, 
And you may have some l,ie." 
"Purr-r, l,urr-r, l,urr, 
O let us have the lie. 
PHI'II' ]tUl'l=l' tlll'll'.  
The three little kittens pt , their 
mittens, 
And soon ate up the lie; 
"0 mother dear, 
We greatly fear, 
That we have s,iled our mittens." 

13 



THE cRI}W,,; AND THE WINDMILL 

THE I'RlWs ANI THE WINI.Xll 

TIIERE was oce a windmill tlmt 
swung its arms r,,un,l an,[ 
,lay at%or ,lay. It ,lid no harm 
an vl_. ,, Iv. 
But there was a fick ,t" crws 
living near wh did not like the 
l>usy mill. They said it wante,1 
kill some f them. What else 
could it mean by swinging its great 
arms the whole day long ? 



FIRST READER 

Bal,v. sleep a little l,mger, 
Till the little limls are str,nger. 
If she s]eel,s a ]ittic bmger. 
Baln l, shall fly away. 

A sE'RET 

Where a I,alw is h,elfin V this nlOl'ninv,do 

I lllink he is dreaming the deare.,.l t" 
Of sons and I" sunshin.. I" liv I,r, nvn 
wings. 

l'll wll v,m a sect.---d,n't tell where 
heard,-- 
The cradle's an e,an,! lhe lalv's a bil 

Br: kind and 1,e gentle 
T those v,-h, are old. 
For dearer is kindness 
And 1,etter than gold. 



THE WINI) AND THE UN 19 

THE WIND AND THE UN 

"You can't do that." 



20 FIRST READER 

Just then a traveller was seen on 
the highway. 
"I can get that traveiler's coat, off 
his back," said the cold, north wind. 
".nd I can make that traveller 
take his coat off in less time than 
you can," answered the bright, 
warm sun. 
"' Try it," roared the cold, north 
wind. 
" You try it first," answered the 
bright, warm sun. 
So the north wind blew a furious 
blast. The man was nearly blown 
down. The clasp of his coat was 
broken: but he held it close about 
him and struggled on. 
.tgain the north wind blew; but 
the man only stood still, holding 



THE WIND AND THE UIN 2] 

his coat closer until the blast was 
over. 
" It is my turn now," said the 
Slln. SO he cane out and poured 
his hot rays straight down upon the 
traveller. 
" This is a strange climate," said 
the traveller; "first so cold, /hen 
so hot. I must take off this heavy 
coat and here is a shady place 1)e- 
neath this tree where I will sit 
down and rest." 
soe 

A I)REA_RY place would le this earth 
Were there no little leople in it, 
The song of life would lse its lnirth 
Were there no children to legin it. 
WHITTIER 



THE I,'RO(.AND THE (}X 

ing himself 
"Oh! Much bigger," replied 
the little frogs. 
A. big as thi.s, then. said lie, 
swclling and lnlffing still harder. 
"k great deal bi,,o'cr " said they: 
"but father! do not try to make 
yourself' as big. If yOll were to 
l)Uff till you 1}urst you c(}uld not 
make yourself half a.s lfig as this 
huge lllOllster." 
But the vain dd frog tried once 
more, and with all his might" "As 
big as"--and then something hap- 
l)ened to the fi'og who had tried to 
do what he was not meant to do. 

DARE to be tme; nothing can. need a lie. 
HERBERT 



DOUBLE TROUBLE 
And as to lfirthiays, we've lint {file 
To Madge IIIHI Dollv's tw,,. 
Wouhl vm like lhat if you were us, 
And 1,}th of us were v,u ? 

27 

" It's ve,'v tryin,g when llllllllllla 
Can't tell us lwo al,art. 
You'd think by this time she'd have 
'!'{ Wll 
W{i kll{iw Ils 1.th l,v hem't Z 
But iu ,ur 1,ietures even we 
Aren't sure whid twin is who. 
Oh. hmv we wih that w,u were 
And lolh ff us were w,u.'" 

PEEPINC,, leel>ing, here and there, 
Ill lawn and meadows everywhere 
Cmfing Ul to find the s 1 "" 
I! 111' 
And hear lhe robin redl,reast sing; 
Cl'eelfing under children's tbet, 
Ghmcing at the vilets sweet; 
'e are small, lut thiuk a nlinute 
Of a world wilh no grass in it 



bctwee them, OlCnCd the wMt, 
and gave this sentence. "One of 
the hclls belongs to him who ws 
the first to ,ce the walnut; the 
other to him wh picked it Ul>. 
As to the kernel, I keep it for 
the costs of the court." 
"This," added he, laughing, "is 
often the end of lawsuits." 

THE QUEER. LITTLE HOUSE 

THERE'S a queer little house and it, stands 
in the sun. 
When the good mother calls the children 
all run. 
While trader her roof they are co and 
WFII L 
Though the cold -xind lnay whistle and 
bluster and srm. 



GREAT NOISE 31 

A GREAT NOISE 

ONCE Ul)m a time five raldits lived 
near a lake in an old forest. 
day lhey heard a great 
noise, anal all rm away 
as thst as lhcy coull. 
The [xcs saw them 
= running ani cnllci ot" 
"Oh rabhits, why 
[ yo run  st and look 
so scared?" The ral- 
 bits rcplie,l" "There 
was a great ise." 
Then the tbxe ran, 
+ The I}ears saw the 
' foxes running and ask- 
- ed" "Oh tixes, why 
you run?" The fbxes 
said" "There was a great noise." 
m .... --  ........... 00. " 



34 FIRST READER 

('HRISTMAS 3IORNING 

ALL the 1,ells on earth slmll ring 
On Christmas Day, 
}n ('hristmas Day, 
All the 1,ells on e:mh shall ring 
ln Christmas Day in the 

All lhe angels in heaven shall .sing 
)n Christmas Day. 
)n ('hristmas liar, 
All the angels in heaven 
l ln Christmas Day in 

shall sing 
the m,)rning. 

Alld eVel'V Olle lilt earth 
h Christmas ]lay, 
On Christmas Day, 
And every one on e;uh 
)n Christmas Day in 

shall sing 

'" PEACE on the earth, g(v)d-will t men." 
From tIeaven's all-gracious King! 
The world h solemu stillness lay 
To hear the Angels sing. 



THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE 

Oh'cE Ul}On a time a Hare overtook 
a Tortoise on a road that led to a 
large city. 
" Good-,orlfil,g, fi'ic,,d Tortoise," 
said the llm'e. " Where are you 
going to-day ?" 
"I am going to the river that 
flows through the city," said the 
Tortoise. 



THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE 

When the tIare awoke fl'om his 
nap he could not see the Tortoise, 
so he said: "What a slow, ohl fel- 
low he is! I shall g'o lack an,l 
look fbr him," lint after g, fing back 
some distance he cmld not find 
him. Then he said t high,self: "I 
think [ shall run on to the river, 
get a ,lrink, and wait fi,r lhc Tor- 
toise." 
When the IIarc came racing 
down to lhe river, there sat the 
smiling Tortoise waiting for him. 
"Well Well " said the Fox, " I 
see that the race is not always won 
by the swift." 
soe 

ALL that's great and good is done 
just by patient trying. 



THE FOX AND THE CAT 39 

THE FOX AND THE CAT 

ONE day a cat met a fix in the 
woods. Now the cat knew that the 
fox had seen a good deal of the 
world, and she thought hiln very 
clever and wise. 
So she said: " Good-lnorning, 
Mr. Fox, how are you?" 
The proud fox looked at her 
from head to foot and said: "How 
dm-e you ask me how I am! Do 



THE BELL OF ATRI 43 

THE BEI,L IF ATRI 

THE king of Atri 1)uilt a tall 
tower and hulg a 1}ig 1}ell in it. 
A long role hung t'rom tile bell to 
the ground. " If' filly one does you 
a wrong, ring this ])ell," said the 
king, "then I shall know that some 
one needs hell)." 
Many l)eol,le rang the ],ellrich 
l)eol)le and poor people, big l, eol,lc 
and little people. But at length 



FIRST READER 

the rope was worn off till a man 
could hardly reach it. Sme per- 

son, l)assing l)y. saw this and 
mended it with a long grape- 

vine. 

Sot far from the town lived a 
faithful old horse, lie had worked 
f'or his master many years and now 
he was too old to work any more. 
This unkind man would not feed 
him 1)ut turned him out on the 
street to starve. 
The loor horse wandered about 
until he saw the grape-vine. He 
was hungry and tried t) eat it. 
This made the bell ring, and the 
king came to see who needed help. 
When he saw .the starving horse he 
sent for his master. 



THE BELL OF ATRI 45 

" This loor horse has served you 
well nauy years." said lhe king. 
" He is dd now and cannot work. 
You nust take him back to his 
stable, and t,ed and care fiw him 
il" the rest 
Then was 
he led hone the hrsc and did 
the king had mlercd. 

f his life." 
the uan ashamed, but 

SNOW 

THIS is tile way the snow comes down, 
Softly, softly fidling; 
So God giveth the snow like wool, 
Fail' and white and 1,eautiflfl. 
This is the way the snow c,mes dwn, 
Softly, softh" tlling. 

<'IS 

WHENE'ER a snow-flake leaves the sky, 
It turns and tuls to say: "Good-bye, 
Good-bye, dear cloud, so cool and gray," 
Then lightly travels on its way. 



THE WOLF AND TIlE {'A'I" 47 

THE W()LF AND THE ('AT 

.A 'I,F rail 
out of'a for- 
est into a 
village, n o t 
because it 
wanted to 
go there but 
because the 
houndswere 
hunting it. 

It saw a cat sitting Oll a gate 
post and said, in its softest voice: 
" Thomas, my fl'iend, tell me quick- 
ly who is the kindest man in the 
village, that I may hide in his bm'n 
fl'om my foes. Do you hear the 
cry of the dogs who are in search 
of me ?" 



FIRST READER 

"Run quickly and ak Mr."mu,"" 
said Thomas; " he is a kind lnan." 
"True." said the wdf, "but I 
have killed (,he ,f his sheep." 
"Well. then. try Mr. Br(wn." 
"I t'ar he is vexed with me be- 
cause I ate one of his gats." 
" SUl)pse ym try Mr. Jones." 
"Mr. Jones! Why I carried off 
one of his calves last slring." 
"So you have done harm to all 
these leol>le. IIow can you ex- 
pect help fi'om those whom you 
have injured ?" 
'" Oh, here are the hounds!" said 
the trembling wolf, and he raced 
away down the streets with the 
dogs close behind. 
"Yes," said the cat, " what one 
SOWS he IIHIS + 'a+'  



THE WIND AND THE LEAVES 9 

THE WIN[) AND THE LEAVES 

"CmTr:, little leaves," said the wind tree day; 
"('ome o'er the meadows with me, and play. 
l)uts)n vmr dresses I" red and ghl,-- 
Summer is g, me, and lhe days grow cold." 

S[[m as the leaves heard the wind's loud call, 
Down they came fluttering, one and all; 
}ver the brown fields they danced and flew, 
Singing the soft little songs they knew. 

Dancing and flying, the little leaves went; 
Winter had called them, and they were 
content. 
Soon fast asleep in their earthy beds, 
The snow laid a ldanket over their heads. 
GEORGE COOPER 

THINK before you speak. 
LooK before you leap. 
ALWAYS do your best. 



.O FIRST READER 

PIPING DOWN THE VALLEYS WILI} 

l'u'tx dwn he valleys wild. 
l'ildn.,_," sm,,_,'s f ldeaalt Flee, 
h a ('h,ud [ aw a child. 
And he, lauvhing, said t me: 

'" Pilot a smg al,mt a Laml! " 
S) I lil)ed with mm'rv cheer. 
"" Pil,el'. l,il,e that s,m 
S [ piped: he welt t hear. 

'" lh', l) th.v l)il)e, thv hal,ly l,ile; 
Sing thv smgs )f ]Jal,l)y eheer " 
So [ sang the same again. 
Iile he wel,l with jff lo hear. 

" Pil,er, sit thee dmvn and write 
In a book, that all may read." 
So he vanished fl'om my sight; 
And I 1,lucked a hollow reed, 

And I made a rural pen. 
And [ stained the water clear. 
And I wrote my happy songs 
Every child may joy to hear. 



56 FIRST READER 

IIe put it on the pony's foot with a 
tap and a rap, and away rode the 
boy--clipl)ety, elippety, clap[ 

MY LITTLE D(LL 

I OXCE had a sweet little doll. dears, 
The prettiest doll in the world; 
Her cheeks were so red and so white, dears, 
And her hair was s charmingly curled, 
But I lost my 1,o.r little doll, dears, 
As I played in the heath one day, 
And I emed for her more than a week, dears, 
But I never could find where she lay. 

I fimnd my poor little doll. dears, 
As I played in the heath one day; 
F)lks say she is terril)lv changed, dears, 
_ For her paint is all wa.hed away, 
And her ann trodden off 1,v the cows, dears, 
And her hair not the least bit curled: 
Yet lbr old sakes' sake she is still, dears, 
The 1)rettie.t doll in the world. 



THE TWO MICE 57 

THE FIELD MOUSE AND THE TOWN 
MOUSE 

Field 3louse 
had a friend 
who lived 
ill a house 
in tile town. 
N o w t h c 
Town Mouse 
was sked by 

tile Field Mouse to dine with him. 
o one morning he went out to tile 
country to visi his friend. A 
noon they sa down to a meal of 
dry corn and wheat. It was the 
best food that the Fiehl Mouse 

could get. 



(2 FIRST READER 

little worm! Ad htw much evil 
lilly R lnal lt, when he does a 
small Wl'Olig, aS lie did who put 
the wormy timider ito the ship. 

AIA('E 

l)axt'lX; on the hilltq., 
Singing in the valleys, 
Laughing with the ethanes, 
MeVl'V little Alice. 

flaying games with lambkins 
In the fl.wering valleys, 
Gat bering pretty losies, 
HellffU] little Alice. 

If her father's cottage 
Turned into a palace, 
And lie owned the hilltops 
Alld the flwering valleys, 
She'd le none the haplfier , 
Happy little Alice. 



THE FOX AND THE HEN 63 

THE FOX AND THE HEN 

A HUNGRY fOX WaS Ollt' ,lay h,okiug 
for a l}oultry-yard. As he was 
passiug a farmhuse, he saw  hen 
aud some chickens which had g(ue 
up iuto a tree fir the uighl, lie 
drew near and iuvited them to 
come dowu aud rejoice with him 
on account of a new trcaty of 1)cacc 
which ha! been formed amoug the 
animals. 



64 FIRST READER 

The heu said she was glad of it, 
but that .he did ot intend to 
conic down lefi>re the ext norn- 
ino. "But, said she, "I see tw,> 
dogs coming: I have no doubt 
they xvill 1,e 2lad to cele >ate the 
peace with y).'" 
,hst the the fix renenbered 
that he had lusines elsewhere, 
ad, lidding the hen 
le'a [o run. 
"Whv do you run?" said the 
hen. "If the animals have made 
leacc, the dgs will nt hurt you. 
I know thel" they are g'd, loyal 
dogs, anal would not harm any 
OIIC. 
"Ah," said the fox, "I fear they 
have not vet heard the  s. 



THE SPIDER AND THE FLY 65 

THE SPIDER ANI) THE FLY 

"WI.L wm walk into my lmrl[ml'?" 
Said the Slfider t, the Fly; 
"'Tis lhe lwetlic,st little lmrhmr 
That ever you did spy. 

"The way int[ my lurlour 
Is Ul a winding stair, 
And I have many em'ims lhin,,'s 
T shrew when .you arc I1 re. 

")h m). m." said the lillh' Fly, 
"T[ ask me is in vain; 
Fw who goes Ul your winkling stair 
Cllll llO'ffl" ClllO dWll agflill. ' 

" Fill .llre V[)ll lllll.%t le welll'V, dear, 
With ,oaring Ul s) high ; 
Will you rest u].m my little led ? " 
Said the Spider t the Fly. 

"There are prelty curtains drawll around; 
The sheets arc film and thin, 
And if you like t[) rest awhile, 
I'll snugly tuck you in!" 



WOI'(|, 
Then 

THE HONEST "WOODMAN 7 
about her. and he did. 
he caught her and" 

--dragged her UlJ hi. winding .tair. 
Into li. dismal den. 
Within his littl l,arbmr 
But she ne'er eamc mt aain. 
MARY Howxx 
( Adapted 

A W{OI) MAN, who 
was cuttiug wod on 
the banks of ,-t river, 

fall into 
He at 
to l,ray 

and 

let his axe 
the water. 
once began 
to the gods t) find 
it for him. 
Mercury appeared 
asked 

him what vas the 

matter. 



FIRST READER 

])mfess,r Wind l,lavcd J,,uder; 
They flew ahm 7 the gnmnd. 
Aud then the larty cnd.d 
hands a(.nss, all round. 
(; EORG E ('[toPER 

TH E I)P, AWIN(; 

A F'.tM(,rs Italian lainter had told 
his 1,upils o ask the name f any 
person who migh come 1o his 
house dtring his absence 
oily. hm day three p_.'entlemen 



"Chen'ies are ripe! and so t(lay 
We'll gather them while wm make the hay; 
Fn' we are the boys with n crn t hoe, 
No cows to milk, and n grass t mw." 
At night the tiu'mer said : " Ilere's a trick  
These roguish rolfins have had their lncl,. 
F. E. VEATHERLEY 

THE F(}I'R PEACHEg 

ONCr: upon a time Ibm" lrothers 
lived together. They were rich 
and halqy. But (me day a great 
storm swelt over the laM, and 

very wise 
went to 
their hard 
them and 
wonderful 

their barns mM houses were 
down, an(l their cattle killed. 
Now, i that land, there lived a 
nmn, and the lrothers 
him and told him of 
luck. He had pity on 
gave each of them a 
peach. 



(;RAY AND WHITE 

" Don't tell me about it," tile ralbit said.- 
She shut u 1) her eyes and her ears gjvw 
red ;-- 
"There's lots of mud and it's sure to stick, 
Because my hair is so hmg and thick." 

" Oh dear[ )h dear!" s)l)l)cd the l,))r little 
mole, 
"Who will hel l) tile fairy out t' lhc h)le? "' 
A c)mmon gray ral)lfit 1))l)l)ed Ul fl'()m the 
gorse, 
" l'lll not very str)ng, lint I'll try, )f cmrse." 

His little tail 1,ol,bed as he waded in, 
The muddy water came up to his chin, 
But he caught the fairy tight by the hand 
Mid sent her off safe into Fairy-land. 

But she kissed him fir.t )n his nluddv nose, 
She kissed his face, and his little wet toes, 
And when the day dawned, in lhc early light 
That little gray rabbit was shining white. 

HON,V thv father and thv mother, that thy 
(I[Ivs IllaV 1,e h,ll, ill the land. 



78 FIRST READER 

AHMET, THE SYRIAN 

AtlMI.:T is a little 
Syrian boy. tie 
lives with his 
thther and mother 
in the old land of 
Palestine, which 
you have read of 
in the Bible. 
llis country is 

not like yours. Iu the warm sea- 
sou there is no mill fi)r months. 
Then the green fields turu hard 
and lr,wn, the rivers and streams 
dry ul). and the leaves ,lr,, 1, ,,ff the 
trees. 
Ahmct's fkther takes great care 
of his well iu this dry weather. It 
is dug outside his house; and he 



AHMET, THE SYRIAN BOY 7. 

puts a great flat stone n tl of it. 
This is to keel cattle f'ron, drinking 
out of" it. 
Ilis ho,se is ,1 like 
either. It is luilt f nud ,r sterne, 
and is luitc lw. The roof is nade 
or' beams o[' wd, and is cocred 
with a thick layer of earth. In the 
Sl)l'ing a crop o[" rich grass springs 
up on these mud ros, and the 
goats find [heir way Ul and eat it. 
In the cx'ening's, Ahmet's thther 
and mother sit on the rod; and 
enjoy the cod 1)reeze a['ter the 
long, hot days. 
The house is only one large 
room. One part is raised like a 
platform, with steps up to it, and 
Ahmet lives there. His father 



AHMET, THE SYRIAN BOY 
You would no like. Ahme's bed, 
I think. I is a mttl'eSs 
with wool ,l' rags a,l covel'el 
with some thick quilts. Ilis pillows 
are made of straw. These are all 
rolled np in a bundle and l,ut away 
in the day time. At iffht they 
are spread on the tic}or, and Ahnet 
sleeps there as well as you 
VOIlI" OWII COZV ]}ells. 
The tbol he lives on is not, like 
yours eilher, lie eats a great deal 
of rice, besides lates, grapes, figs 
and olives, }}u n}t much neat. 
tie has no set time for 1}reakthst. 
and dimmer as you have. lie takes 
a hanlfid of gral}eS or dales when- 
ever he is hungry. But each 
evening at snnset, when the work 
6 



84 FIRST READER 

Three little lmgs in It lulsket, 
And the leds 1,ul: two would ]l,hl : 
S, they all three fell to quarrelling, 
The white and the llaek and gld ; 
And two of the lmgs gt under the rugs, 
And me was mt in the cold I 

S lie that was left in the l,asket. 
With, mr a ermnl t chew, 
lh'a thread to wrap himself withal, 
llqlell the wind acv,ss hint 1,1ew, 
Pulled one ,,f the rugs fl,m ,,he ,f the 
And so the lnarrel grew [ 

And s there was war in the basket, 
Ah, pity 'tis, 'tis true! 
But he that was fl'ozen and starved at 
last 
A strength flmt his weakness drew. 
And pulled the rugs ti'm 1,oth of the 
bugs, 
And killed and ate them 



THE FROC. PRINCE 87 

"Oh, ' " 
)es, said she, " I promise 
all you ask, only bring" back my 
ball." 
No sooner had the fl'og brought 
back the ball than the princess 
picked it up and ran away with it 
o the palace, leaving the flog 
behind. 
Next day, as the king and his 
thmily sat at dinner, a knock was 
heard at the door and a voice said" 

" Princess, youngest princess! 
O1)en the do,r for llle! 
Do VO[I kllOW what I,ctbll 
Yesterday I,y the side of the well?" 

The princess told her thther who 
it was and what she had promised. 
Then said the king" " Yo must do 
what you said you would. Go and 



q,q FIRST READER 

let him in." She did so and the 
fi'og h()l)l)e(1 alog t the table. 
" Lift me Ul," said the fi'og, 
"a,l put ne on the talkie.'" But 
he would ot, until her thther bade 
her d, it. " Now, lh your little 
golden plate )ea'er t,) me that we 
may eat together." 
When she refuse(l, l)ecause she 
was aft'aid of the fi'og, her lhther 
said" '" You ought not t() feel 
t()ward one who helped you when 
v()u we)'(, in ()'()t)l)le. What you 
have l))'()mised you nust d()." 
() she )n()ve(l her li((le gohlen 
l)late )earer (() him, and they ate 
ttethe. When ,_he had done her 
dinner she beg'an (o fee] less afi'ai(l 
of (he fi'og, and in the afternoon 
she playe(l with 



THE FROG PRIN('E 

Next mornin, the strangest thing 
had happened. The fl'og was no- 
where to be seen, but at the top 
of the stairs she tbund, waiting 
her, a charming young ll'im'c. IIe 
tohl her h)w he had been changed 
into a fl'og l,y a wicked thiry and 
shut up in the well, and that no 
one 1)ut the most 1)cautiful princess 
who wouhl lnakc a fl'icnd of him 
could change him back a'ain. 
( Adap@ ) 

TUE vulture cat.,s Ietwecn his mculs, 
And that's the reason why 
He very, ve T rarely lcls 
As well as you or I. 
His eye is dull, his head is lahl. 
His neck is growing thinner. 
Oh, what a lesson fi,r us all, 
T[ only eat at dinner  



9(} FIRST READER 

TIlE BIRI)S NEST 

'" "I',WlIIT ! to-whiL ! t-whce ! 
Will vm listen t, hie ? 
Wh st,le lnn" e,,',,'s I laid, 
And the nice nest l made ?" 

" Not |," said the c,w, '" Mt..! 
Such a thing I'd ever d. 
[ gave ym a wisp of hay, 
But didn't take vtlll" lleSt awav. 
N.t I," said the cow, " 3[o.,! 
Such a thing l'd never (hL" 

" To-whit ! to-whit ! to-whee ! 
Will you listen to me ? 
W]. stole Ibm" egs [ laid, 
And the nice nest I made ?" 

" Not I," said the dog, "Bow-w[w 
I wouldn't Ire so mean, anyhow ! 
1 gave the hairs/lie nest to make, 
But the nest I did not take. 
Not I," said the dog, "Bow-wow ! 
l'lll llOt SO lllelLll, allvhow.  



WHO STOLE TIIE BIRD'S NEST 

"To-whir! to-whir! t)-whce! 
Will )'l)[! listen to 
Who sh)lc li)m" ,,,s I laid, 
And lhe ni(.c nest I mndc? " 

" Not l," 
[ wuldn't trent  l)))r l)h'd s). 
[ gave w)l lhc nest to line, 
But the nest was m)nc f mine. 
Baa I Baa 
I wouldn't treat r l)r },ird s.'" 
"Caw [ ('aw [ " cried the crow ; 
" I shouhl like to kmw 
What thief took nwav 
A 1,ird's nest 
" I would not rol a bird," 
Said little Mary Green; 
" I lhink I never heard 
Of anylhing so mean." 
"It is very cruel, t)o," 
Said little Alice Neal; 
" [ wonder if he knew 
How sad the bird wouhl lel '?" 



9:2 FI R.T READER 

A little 1,v hun dwn his head, . 
And wen and hid 1,ehind the led, 
F,,r he stole that pretty nest 
Fv m 1 oor little yellow-1 ,reast ; 
And he llt so fifll f shame, 
lie didn't like t tell his name. 

IN TEA LA.ND 
LXST year Mary and I went across 
the se to a laml where teu grows. 
We travelled every day for weeks 
to get to that land. When we 



arrived we went to the home of 
Matsu, the little girl who appears 
in the centre of this picture. 
Matsu has a yellow skin and her 
eyes are not straight across as ours 
are. They slant upwards a little. 
She did not shake hands with 
us when we met but 1)owed her 
head to the ground and spread her 
arms out wide. That is the way 
they greet a stranger in Japan. 
Matsu 1)rought us to her home 
but, before going into the house, 
she took off her little wooden 
boots and put on straw sandals. 
The walls of the house were made 
of paper, and the posts of bamboo. 
As there were no chairs we sat 
upon rugs and cushions on the 
floor. 



94 FIRST READER 

A dinner each person had a 
little table fiw himselt: We were 
served with cakes, some fish, and 
1,wls of rice. We tried to ea 
rice with two chopsticks. I was 
like trying to liR peas with two 
lead-pencils. Tea was served in 
dainty little cups without sugar or 
vream. After dinner the tables 
were taken away, and we were tohl 
many stories about Japan. 
A lcd-time walls were drawn 
}ut t} make rooms fr us. Thick 
luilts were l}la.ed upon the floors 
for I}eds. The pillows were of 
wood c{}vered with laper. In the 
morning the walls were drawn back 
and the house made into one big 
rOOlll. 



IN TEA LAND 

After lreakfast we were taken 
tbr a drive in a cart with two 
wheels. These light carts are 
drawn by men who run almost as 
fast as a hol'e trots. We went out 
to the fields where tea is grown. 
Tea plants are Ibm" ,r five tl, et 
high. They are set out in rows 
across the fields. We saw many 
girls l>icking the hright green 
leaves, one by one. They carry 
these home in baskets on their 
heads. The tea leaves are spread 
out in the sun to dry, and are then 
lint into boxes and sent on to the 
factory. There the leaves are l>ut 
into iron bowls, set in large vens, 
and stirred and rubbed until they 
are fully dried. It is thus that tea 
is made ready for use in our homes. 



SPRING- WAKIN 97 

"But I sit)', 3h'. Sun, .ll'd the Rol,ins here ? " 
"Maybe," said the Sun. "Mavle "; 
"There wasn't a lil'd when you called last 
Vfll'." 
"COllie Ollt.," said the tlll, "and see[" 

The Snowdrop sighed, fi>r she liked hel" 
And there wasn't a 1,ird in sigsht, 
But she lOlqed out of bed in hea' white 
night-ca 1 ; 
"That's rizht." said the Sun. "That's 
right ! " 

And, sm a. that small night-cap was seen, 
A Robin 1,egan to sing, 
The air grew warm, and the grass turned 
green. 
" 'Tis spring! " laughed the SUl, " 'Tis 
slWilg ! ,, 
ISABEL ECCLESTONE .,[A('KAY 

Do all the god you can, 
In all the wav.s you can, 
To all the people you can, 
Just as hmg as you can. 



98 FIRST READER 

TIlE PIED PIPER 

years ago the little town of 
llamelil was overrun with rats--- 

big, fierce rats. 

They fou,g'ht the dogs and killed the eats 
Aml I)it the Ialies in the cradles 
And ate the cheeses ut ot" the vats 
And made nests inside men's Sunday hats. 

Every one tried to think of 
s.omc plan hy which the rats could 



THE PIED PIPER 99 

be driven out. When many plans 
had failed, the people came to the 
town-hall to tell the Mayor that he 
must do something. 
The Mayor said he would give 
anythilg he had to the man who 
would rid the /own of these rats. 
As he was speaking a knock was 
heard at the door. 

" Bless us ! " cried the Mayor. "What's 
that ". 
Anything like the sound 1" a 
Makes lily heart go lfitalat  '' 

The door opened and in came a 
man whom no one there had ever 
seen before. He wore a long coat, 
half of yellow and half of red, and 
carried a pipe or flute. 
"Who are you ?" said the Mayor. 



THE PIED PIPER 101 

When the Piper came back for 
his fee the 3layor gave him only 
fifty pieces. 
"Give me the money )'Ol| 1,rom- 
ised or you will be sorry," said the 
Piper. 
" The rats are all dead." said the 
Mayor. 
Then the Piper went out int, 
the street and began t play a 
sweeter tune than befbre. 

Out ealne the children l'unnillg : 
All the little lovs and girls, 
With rosy cheeks and flaxen earls, 
And sparkling eyes and teeth like l,earls. 

The Piper went down the street. 
and out into the field. The chil- 
dren ran after him skipping and 
singing. When they came to the 



FIRST READER 

Balw Swalhw lightly 
Spreads out 1.,th his wings, 
,lweads them quite mt in the  ind. 
And then fbrward .lwing's. 

surlwi.e [--he's flying [ 
Nthing more he fears; 
If, rand al,mt the church he goes. 
And h,w well he steers! 

M,ther-Bird leside him. 
Singing full and str, mg, 
To the G,d wh eur|'ied him. 
All her 
From the French ,,f RAMBERT 

TII vem",s at the 
The dav',s at the lnon: 
Morning".s at seven ; 
The hillside's dew pearled; 
The lark's on the wing; 
The snail's on the tho ; 
Gd's in His heaven-- 
All's fight with the world  

]ROWNING 



OOGLY, THE LITTLE ESKIMO 105 

.- @ 

OOGLY, THE LITTLE ESKIMO 

OOGLY is a little Eskilno boy, wh<) 
lives in the cold north land. Ill 
that land there is little but ice and 
snow. In stmmler the days are 
very long that there is hardly any 
night. In winter the nights arc 
long that little Oogly seldom sees 
the suit shining. 
There are no trees in this cold 
land, but there is a kind of hard, 



OOI.Y THE LIX'I'LE E.KI.MO 
light and this is covered wilh a lhi 
piece of skin. 
Oogly does not wash and dres 
and eat a you ,lo. tie never 
washes in water, but rubs his ihce 
with oil. This he]l)s to keel) ]fin) 
wrIII. 
Then he mut wear warm clothes; 
u) he puts on two Ihr suits. The 
inside one has the fin' next his 
l)ody; the .other one has the fin' 
outs'de. These suits are made 
seal-skh or bear-kiu, a(l so are his 
boots. Ills stockings are made 
the soft down of birds which his 
ihther kills, lie takes off his outer 
suit when he goes into the house, 
ibr it is always warm there. 
When he dines, he sits on a long 



| 0 FIRST READER 
l>ench made of ice and covered 
with furs-and at night he sleeps 
there, t<m. IIe eats the meat and 
tht of the walrus and lhe lcars and 
seals his thther kills. When he is 
thirsty he drinks the oil that comes 
fi'om them. Sometimes his mother 
cow,ks soup, }t very often he eats 
meat in long, thin, raw strips, 
which would not look nice to you 
even if you were very hungry. 
tie has no candy like you have. 
His father kills the birds that come 
there in summer and his mother fills 
the lmnes of their t,et, and legs 
with tht. I hese filled bones are 
the only candies Oogly has. 
He never saw a horse or cow, 
only seals, bears, and the dogs 



OOGLY THE LITTLE ESKIMO lO 
which draw his sled. The sled is 
made of bones, tied with strips of 
skin. It is drawn by four or six 
dogs. O.ogly cracks his whip and 
shouts to the first dog'; the other 
dogs follow their leader, ad away 
they go at a great pace ,vcr/he ice 
and snow. 
In summer Oogly's Ihther spears 
seals through a hole in the ice. 
Then everybody has to help to 
dress the skins and beat them soft, 
so that they can be made into shoes 
and clothes. The knife Oogly's 
fther uses to skin the seal with, is 
made of bone. So is the needle 
his mother sews the skins with. 
Her thread is made of thin strips 
of skin. 



Slm" it started; 
S.m it, darted, 
('1 and clear m,1 free, 
Ri I q ding wer 1 el d des, 
flurrying to the sea. 

('hihh'en straying 
('alne a-ldaying 
)n its pretty lmnks; 
Glad. mr little ]mklet 
Sparkled u 1) its thanks. 

Bh iSSOll is fll Rlt ing 
Mimic 1.ating, 
Fishes darting fast, 
Swift. and strmg and haply , 
Widening Vel'V filst. 

Bullding, singing, 
Rushing, ringing, 
Flecked with shade and sun, 
Son our little lmklet 
To the sea has rim. 



112 FIRST READER 

FILLING A BASKET WITH WATER 

IN the fhr-away land of Persia 
there once lived a king who did 
not like doing things just as every- 
body else did. He always tried to 
find other ways of' getting what he 
wanted done. 
Once lie wished to find a man 
who would do .just what he was 
told,--and this is the story of how 
he found him. 



FILLING A BASKET WITH WATER 113 

He made it known that he 
wanted men to do some work, and 
chose two out of more than a 
hundred who came to him. 
Hc took them to his garden and 
gave them a large basket, telling 
them to fill it with water froln the 
well. Then he left them, saying 
that he should come back at sunset 
to see their work, and if they had 
done it well they should be paid. 
The men began pouring water 
into the basket without thinking 
much about what they were doing. 
But at last one said to the other: 
"We are very foolish to go on with 
this work, for we can never fill the 
basket. The water runs out as fast 
as we can pour it in." 
8 



114 FIRST READER 

But lIassan, the other man, said" 
"That does not natter to us; the 
king nust know why he wanls us 
o till this basket wilh water. 
Besides lhal, we shall le well paid 
if w  do it 1o please him- and what 
more do vo want?" 
"Very well, you do as you like, 
but I shall not 'o ,,n with such a 
silly lfiece f work." As he said 
this, the first nan threw away his 
pail, and went off. 
lIassa did ot say anything in 
relly, lint kept on working the 
whole day. When sunset came he 
was tired and stiff', but the well was 
very early empty. 
tie was just pouring out the last 
pailthl, when he spied something 



FIIJLI_N'G- A BASKET WITH WATER ] 15 

very }wight which had thllen into 
the basket. When he looked 
again, he saw it was a fine gold 
ring. It had been lying at the 
bottom f' the well. ad he had 
brought it up in lis last, lmil of 
water. 
"Now," he said, ' I see why the 
king wanted us to pour the water 
into the basket. If I had just 
poured it OtlL on the ground the 
ring might never have been fbund." 
When the king saw the ring" he 
was very glad, for he knew that 
this was just the kind of' man he 
was looking fbr. He told IIassan, 
firs of" all, tha he might keep the 
ring fbr himself'. "And," he said, 
"you have done his Olle Slllall 



FIRST READER 

The little 1)ors on lhc 
thns are lla(.k, with w(.llv heads, 
]right eyes al sch white t(,eth. 
As i is so hot 
.:..;- ,,., an! their 
""" milk is got 
lhc c((:oa-l. Their 'ul)s are made 
coo(m-nuts (.tt in two. 

th'v wear 
ly any vhthcs. 
We eat bread 
ad drik milk 
So ,1,, they, 
their Iread is 
nalc ,f I)anan- 

llerc is a 1)anma tree. See its 
lmg trunk with nnvs t' lig, broad 
leaves like a (.town m'omd its top. 



IN BANANA LAND 

Each leaf is so large that, if ldaccd 
on the ground, a nml cal lie at fitll 
length Ul)(} it. The w}rkcrs i the 
l)amma fields luild the walls 
rooI 1' their" huts o1' thee leaves 
and the wmcu weave nmts and 
rug's out of them. 
Look under the leaves n this 
tree. Here are the bananas. They 
grow in circles round a tem and 
curve upwards towards the sun. 
At first each little banana is covered 
with a brown huk. After a time 
this husk dries Ul ad Ihlls 
Then, under the hade of the big" 
leaves, the lanana grow in the hot 
moist weather till they become ripe. 
In a little less than a yenr the 
banana plant grows into a tree, 



120 FIRST READER 

bears its big cluster of fl'uit and is 
then cut dwn. In its place is set 
mt another plant to bear its crop 
next year. 
II, ])almlm land the children have 
never seen an apple tree. It is as 
strange to them as a balmUa tree is 
to Vu. When you drive on our 
roads yoli see, on either side, fields 
of" wheat alld oats alld clover; 
orchards of apples, plums and pears. 
In lanana land you drive between 
fields of cot/ira and sugar-calm and 
tolmcco; orchards of figs aud oranges 
and lfine-al)ples. 
If your drive is taken at the right 
season you may see the negroes 
digging up the roots of the ginger 
l)lant. These roots when scalded 



and cleaned are ground into a pow- 
der which we know as ,,-in,,-ov The 
tender roots [f the' young llants 
are often put into jars and covered 
with syl'Ul). This is our preserved 
ginger. 

('RADI.E S( 

SIn-T, little slcelY blue eyes; 
Dear little head, be at rest; 
Jesus, like ym, 
Was a l al v mee, too, 
And lept m his mvn mother's 
1 weast. 

Sleep, little baby of urine, 
,Ro|'t Oll VOlll" lfillw so white; 
Jesus is here 
To wateh over you, deal', 
And nothing can harnl you to-night. 



122 FaST READER 

EVENING HYMN 

Tin: hours of day arc wer, 
The evening calls us home; 
(}liCe lllll' [I) Thee, 0 Father. 
With thankfltl hearts we come. 

F()r life and health, an(1 shelter 
Fl'mn harm throughout the day, 
The kindness of our teachers, 
The gladness of our l)lay ; 

For all the dear afliection 
(If larents, brothers, friends, 
To llinl ,ur th:lnks we render 
Wllo these and all things sends. 

Lord, gather all Thy children 
To meet in Heaven at last, 
When earthly tasks are ended, 
And eartlllv days are last.